Blackface

The session in which we explore the history of blackface. We talk about its origins, how it developed over time, and why it’s offensive. Blackface brings up a very disrespectful, demeaning racist societal history. We learned how insidiously such things were a part of our upbringing and it’s part of the racism we are rooting out and working against. 

Representation in Sports

Who comes first to your mind when you think about African American tennis players? There are several we all know now including Serena and Venus Williams, Sloane Stephens, and Frances Tiafoe to name a few. Many people think first of Arthur Ashe who was the only Black man to win the singles title at Wimbledon, the US Open, and the Australian Open. But it was Althea Gibson, the tennis legend, who broke the racial barrier in the sport as the first ever African American to win a Grand Slam title. She was an amazing athlete and in this session we highlight her accomplishments as we consider the importance of representation, acknowledgment, and appreciation in sports, as in all things.  

RedLining

We begin our 3rd season journey into learning and uncovering as much as we can about our truthful past with RedLining – a practice that purposely maintained segregation through discrimination in lending. We discuss its racist history, how it promoted both segregation and the wealth gap, and the continued forms it takes even today. 

A couple of books we mentioned to learn more about RedLining: 

Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein

NationalFairHousing.org

 

Education Whitewash

Just us Shrinks having an After Hours discussion about the lack of actual American History in our prior education – trying to come to terms with our whitewashed understanding of so many things, on so many levels.   

One View From the Ground

The session in which we speak once again with Nurah Muhammad (shrinksonthird.com/actionism-sister-nurah-muhammad), who lives and works in Camden, NJ. For this session we reached out to get Sister Nurah’s take on the changes in the Camden Police Department, recently touted as a successful model of community  policing. She offered her perspective on what’s working, what isn’t, and what still needs improvement. 

Viral Inequities

An After Hours session with Allison Gibbs, LCSW (Therapy Concierge, LLC) focusing on the Coronavirus health disparities highlighted in the news. We first debunk a very offensive and baseless idea that this is because of some biological predisposition to the novel coronavirus among Black people, and talked more sanely about why these inequities truly exist and why we’re seeing them right now. Not the most lighthearted of our After Hours conversations, but it’s always a positive experience to open up in heartfelt dialog with Allison.

Grant Blvd

The session in which we speak with Kimberly McGlonn, Ph.D. about her brand, Grant Blvd and the ways she works to challenge  economic injustice and marginalization. Dr. McGlonn launched Grant Blvd – named for the Milwaukee street where she grew up – as a sustainable design brand creating pathways to employment for people with a history of incarceration. All of their original and stylish garments are made from reclaimed fabrics, and through her brand, Kimberly works to advance the collective good of both people and the planet.

You can learn more on her website; you can also shop there!            Fyi – they’re also making and selling masks right now.

 www.grantblvd.com 

 

Poor People’s Economic Human Rights

The session in which we talk with Cheri Honkala, co-founder of the Poor People’s Economic Human Rights Campaign (PPEHRC).  Cheri was removed from her Mother’s home as a girl and raised in foster care. She later attended college and had a child of her own. After experiencing homelessness as a single mom due to unfortunate circumstances, Honkala realized her Mother was not ‘bad’ after all; She was struggling in a society that offered no resources.  Cheri has been organizing poor and homeless people for over 30 years and is now a General in the Poor People’s Army.

economichumanrights.org

poorpeoplesarmy.com

North Philly Peace Park

The session in which we chat with 3 passionate team members from the North Philadelphia Peace Park. The NPPP is a charitable eco-campus providing free education, health & wellness, and produce programs to the Philadelphia Community.  We chatted with Nyasha Felder, Li Sumpter, and Bird – each bringing different knowledge, skill, and perspective to their volunteer work at the NPPP. 

phillypeacepark.org

The Peace Park has recently launched a project campaign to get their planned Peace Pavilion completed. To learn about it and donate please visit:  https://ioby.org/project/north-philly-peace-park-peace-pavillion-project

Commitment to Racial Justice

In this session, we devote our podcast to things we can do to promote racial justice. We also made the following commitment based upon a campaign crafted by Tangia Al-Awaji Estrada of the WOC Podcasters Community which is led by Danielle Desir:

“We are podcasters united to condemn the tragic murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor and many many others at the hands of police. This is a continuation of the systemic racism pervasive in our country since its inception and we are committed to standing against racism in all its forms. 

We believe that to be silent is to be complicit. 

We believe that Black lives matter. 

We believe that Black lives are more important than property. 

We believe that we have a responsibility to use our platforms to speak out against this injustice whenever and wherever we are witness to it. 

In creating digital media we have built audiences that return week after week to hear our voices and we will use our voices to speak against anti-blackness and police brutality, and we encourage our audiences to be educated, engaged, and to take action.”

Thank you Tangia and WOC Podcasters. We stand with you.